Kidney tumours

Kidney tumour removal with organ preservation

Today, most malignant kidney tumours are detected in time for kidney-preserving tumour removal to be considered. The advantage of such a procedure is better preservation of kidney function.

The type of procedure depends on the size and location of the kidney tumour. In the vast majority of cases, the kidney tumour can be removed while preserving the functioning kidney tissue. In the case of very large tumours, even nowadays removal of the kidney is still necessary in certain cases.

Both minimally invasive and open surgical techniques can be used for all types of kidney tumour procedures. All surgical procedures for the treatment of kidney tumours are offered at Goldstadt Private Clinic. Robot-assisted da Vinci kidney tumour removal is the preferred surgical method at Goldstadt Private Clinic.

Complete kidney removal for a non-functioning kidney or kidney tumour

If there is a non-functioning kidney or very large tumours in the kidney present, removal of the kidney is still necessary in certain individual cases. Both minimally invasive and open surgical techniques can be used for all types of kidney surgery. All surgical procedures for the treatment of kidney diseases are offered at the Goldstadt Private Clinic.

Organ-preserving robot-assisted da Vinci kidney tumour removal

In contrast to conventional incision surgery, robot-assisted da Vinci procedures allow access to the kidney via very small skin incisions. The tumour is removed in a very precise way using a three-dimensional, magnified view. A high-resolution ultrasound is used to allow exact localisation of the tumour in the abdominal cavity during the operation. It is important to obtain precise knowledge of the blood supply to the kidney before removing the tumour. This is done with a special fluorescent dye that colour-marks vessels with blood flow. Nowadays, robot-assisted da Vinci surgery is considered the optimal procedure for organ-preserving kidney tumour removal.

Questions about diagnosis and treatment of a kidney tumour:

In addition to benign kidney tumours, two types of malignant tumours can be distinguished. The most common is renal cell carcinoma, which originates from the kidney tissue itself. If the tumour originates in the mucous membrane of the renal calyceal system, it is known as a urothelial carcinoma. Unfortunately, this type of cancer often requires complete removal of the kidney and ureter. Incidentally, renal cysts are almost always benign findings; about one in five patients over the age of 40 has at least one renal cyst.

Kidney cancer, like most cancers, is not usually “felt” in the early stages. Renal cell carcinoma is often discovered by chance during a routine ultrasound examination. The tumour can also be discovered incidentally when a computer tomography (CT) is carried out, for example due to back or abdominal complaints. Blood in the urine can, among other causes, be an indication of the presence of a kidney tumour.

If they are large enough, kidney tumours are easily recognisable on ultrasound. They can be reliably identified by computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

If a kidney tumour is present and has not spread, surgery is the treatment of choice. Other methods, such as medication or radiation, are not possible to heal kidney cancer.

An ultrasound examination should always be supplemented by a CT or MRI scan, to exclude the possibility that the tumour has formed metastases. This also allows the size and location to be clearly assessed, which makes it possible to choose the right surgical procedure. Occasionally, further examinations are necessary, such as an endoscopic ureteroscopy (URS). A prior kidney biopsy is only performed in exceptional cases.

It is difficult to answer this question before the surgical procedure. The removed tissue is examined by the pathologist, who provides information on the stage of the tumour. If the cancer has been completely removed there is sometimes a good chance of recovery.

Short info on organ-preserving robot-assisted kidney tumour removal

Indication Tumours in the kidney
Procedure

Kidney-preserving removal of the tumour through minimally invasive access.
Enlarged view of the surgical area.
Three-dimensional view through robot-assisted surgery

Surgery time Approx. 2-3 hours
Clinic stay 5-7 days
Note General anaesthesia

Questions on organ-preserving robot-assisted kidney tumour removal

Inpatient stay for robot-assisted da Vinci kidney tumour removal begins the day before the procedure. The procedure takes place under general anaesthesia. The minimally invasive instruments of the robot are inserted into the abdominal cavity using the keyhole technique. Using three-dimensional vision, the surgeon can see the tumour and carefully removes it from the kidney. In addition, intraoperative high-resolution ultrasound is used to precisely locate the tumour. This is made possible by a special ultrasound probe which, because of its small size, can be inserted into the abdominal cavity. The robot-assisted surgical technique allows the best possible preservation of kidney function. Postoperative care takes place in the recovery room before transfer to the normal ward. The entire inpatient stay lasts approx. 5-7 days.

The type of operation depends on the size and location of the tumour. In the vast majority of cases, the kidney tumour can be removed while preserving the functioning kidney tissue. In the case of very large tumours, removal of the kidney is still necessary in certain individual cases.

Both minimally invasive and open surgical techniques can be used for all types of kidney tumour procedures. All surgical procedures for the treatment of kidney tumours are offered at Goldstadt Private Clinic. Robot-assisted da Vinci kidney tumour removal is the preferred surgical method at Goldstadt Private Clinic.

Due to the tenfold magnification, the anatomical structures can be viewed much better than with conventional laparoscopy. Special laser imaging during the procedure enables precise measurements of the blood supply of the kidney and tumour. Compared to the conventional (incision) surgical technique, this results in less blood loss, less pain, and a shorter inpatient stay.

No.

In general, professional activities corresponding to an office job are possible again 2-3 weeks after the procedure. Alternatively, follow-up treatment is possible following inpatient stay. Sport and physical activities can be resumed after three months.

The kidney tumour removal is performed under general anaesthesia. Due to the relatively small incisions used for the robot-assisted da Vinci procedure, hardly any pain is expected after the surgical procedure.