Urethral slit (Urethrotomy) for urethral strictures

Endoscopic urethral slitting is the surgical procedure of choice for first-time narrowing of the urethra

Short info on urethrotomy

Indication First occurrence of urethral stricture
Procedure Endoscopic slitting of the constriction
Surgery time Approx. 15 minutes
Clinic stay 1-2 nights
Note Spinal anaesthesia or general anaesthesia

Questions about urethrotomy

A long, thin instrument is inserted in the urethra and guided gently up. The endoscopic image is transferred to a screen, allowing the surgeon to locate the constriction. A small knife, which can be operated from the outside, slits the narrowing until the urethra is the normal width. At the end of the procedure, a catheter is inserted for splinting.

During the first 1-2 days, a catheter remains in the bladder and ensures that the mucous membrane heals well. Only in rare cases does the catheter need to stay in longer. In the follow-up treatment, the strength of the urine stream and correct emptying of the bladder are examined.

In addition to the general risks of any surgical procedure, such as bleeding or fever, injuries to the sphincter muscle can occur in very rare cases if the stricture is close to that area. The greatest risk is the recurrence of the stricture. All possible risks of the surgical intervention are discussed in a detailed explanatory discussion prior to the procedure.

A urethrotomy can help many patients permanently. However, since the urethra unfortunately has a tendency to scar, some patients experience renewed narrowing from a few months to several years after the procedure. Nevertheless, the procedure is useful because it is relatively easy to perform and does not take a long time.